Hillyard Street

Hillyard Street was originally called Russell street.

It is likely that the name Russell Street was in honour of Lord John Russell a Liberal politician who served twice as Prime Minister in the mid-19th century, click here for more info. As for the current street name it is very likely that the street is named after Anne Hillyard, the widow of a clergyman who stumped up a huge amount of money for the founding of Stockwell Orphanage in 1867 . Russell Street can be seen on maps as far back as 1837. Heavily bombed in WW2 there are no surviving original buildings.

Charles Booth’s Map of London Poverty research took him to Russell Street in 1895. See below for how he graded this street…

Although it might look a bit more like pink in this print checking his notebooks Booth actually colour coded Russell Street as ‘Purple”, see the key here:

For more on how our area was graded on the Poverty maps click here.

British History online tells us about the houses that once stood on Hillyard Street:

“Nos. 37–61 (odd) Hillyard Street: Formerly Nos. 11–23 (consec.) Russell Street

Nos. 37–61 form a continuous well-maintained terrace of three-storey houses, each two windows wide, of which Nos. 37–47 form one group and Nos. 49–61 another. The groups are similar and of the same height to their parapets. The former group has a linking band at first-floor sill level while the others are linked at first-floor level. The ground floor windows and doorways have round arches springing from stone imposts; the first-floor windows have gauged flat arches set in shallow semi-circular headed recesses. The terrace is devoid of ornament except for the castiron guards protecting the first-floor windows of Nos. 49–61. December 31, 1822; James Crundall.”

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *